General Dermatology Encompasses a Wide Range of Topics

At Scholes Dermatology in Twin Falls, we offer a number of services for a range of skin disorders including acne, warts, psoriasis, and more. To get started with a dermatologist appointment, get in touch with us today.


General Dermatology


Full Body Check

Full Body Check

We look from head to toe for irregular moles or other skin cancers. You do have the option of leaving undergarments on. Usually during the process, a variety of benign lesions are also identified and discussed. This is all done to make the patient better aware of benign and/or concerning lesions that should be monitored over the next several months. We also discuss symptoms of melanoma, and how to minimize your risk. As always, we suggest this for anyone with a family history of melanoma, excessive sun exposure, history of blistering sunburns, or tanning bed history. Depending on your risk factors, we suggest getting a full body exam every 18 months to a year. We always encourage a full body exam, but an upper body might be better for you. Be sure to discuss this when making your appointment, as we will need to schedule enough time for this.

It is possible to find skin cancer early. This cancer begins where we can see it. The first sign may be a slowly growing bump, a changing mole, or a dry and scaly rough patch. When treated before it spreads, most skin cancers have a high cure rate. Even melanoma, a type of skin cancer that can spread quickly, is very treatable when detected early. The key is to know your skin. If you notice a spot or lump that is growing, bleeding, or changing, you should make an appointment to see a dermatologist.

Skin Cancers

Skin Cancer

It is possible to find skin cancer early. This cancer begins where we can see it. The first sign may be a slowly growing bump, a changing mole, or a dry and scaly rough patch. When treated before it spreads, most skin cancers have a high cure rate. Even melanoma, a type of skin cancer that can spread quickly, is very treatable when detected early. The key is to know your skin. If you notice a spot or lump that is growing, bleeding, or changing, you should make an appointment to see a dermatologist.

View Melanoma Detection Sheet

Warts

Warts

Warts are benign (not cancerous) skin growths that appear when a virus infects the top layer of the skin. Viruses that cause warts are called human papillomavirus (HPV). You are more likely to get one of these viruses if you cut or damage your skin in some way. Wart viruses are contagious and can spread by contact with the wart, or by something that touched the wart. Warts can grow on any part of your body. They are often the same tone as your skin and rough, but they can be dark (brown or gray-black), flat, and smooth as well.

Acne

Acne

Many people think that acne is just pimples, but a person who has acne can have any of these blemishes:

  • Blackheads
  • Whiteheads
  • Papules
  • Pustules (what many people call pimples)
  • Cysts
  • Nodules

Acne appears on the face in all of the photographs above, but it can also appear on other areas of the body including the back, chest, neck, shoulders, upper arms, and buttocks.

Skin Rashes

Rash

There are many causes of skin rashes: eczema, atopic dermatitis, allergic or irritant contact dermatitis, and breakdown of your skin’s barrier are a few of the most common causes. If you have dry, scaly, or itchy skin, there’s likely a reason, and we can treat and manage this. Many times the problem is environmental, or perhaps an internal inflammatory disorder. Other times it is simply the patient using the wrong topical products that prevent repair of their skin barrier. Make an appointment to have dry and itchy skin evaluated.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis

What is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis (sore-EYE-ah-sis) is a chronic (long-lasting) disease. It develops when a person’s immune system sends faulty signals telling skin cells to grow too quickly. New skin cells form in days rather than weeks. The body does not shed these excess skin cells. The skin cells pile up on the surface of the skin, causing patches of psoriasis to appear. Psoriasis may look contagious, but it's not. To get psoriasis, a person must inherit the genes that cause it. Watch this video as dermatologist David M. Pariser, MD, FAAD, explains why we get psoriasis and how treating your psoriasis can improve your life.

Moles

Moles

If a mole starts to grow, itch, or bleed, make an appointment to see a dermatologist. Moles are common, and almost every adult has at least a few. Adults who have light skin often have more moles, from 10 to 40, which is normal. You should not be overly worried about your moles unless you notice they are growing, itching, or bleeding.

You should know…

  • A type of skin cancer, melanoma, can grow in or near a mole.
  • Caught early and treated, melanoma can be cured.
  • The first sign of melanoma is often a change to a mole — or a new mole on your skin.
  • Checking your skin can help you find melanoma early. A dermatologist can show you how to examine your skin and tell you how often you should check your skin.

Moles in Children

As a parent, you should know that moles on a young child’s skin are generally nothing to worry about. It is normal for new moles to appear during childhood and adolescence. Moles will grow as the child grows. Some moles will darken, and others will lighten. These changes are expected in children and are seldom a sign of melanoma — a type of skin cancer that can begin in a mole.

For more information about the above services, contact us at Scholes Dermatology to schedule an appointment with us!

Scholes Dermatology |
526 Shoup Avenue W, Suite A Twin Falls, ID 83301
| 208.734.5555 | info@scholesdermatology.com